Thompson's fine from parents 'a joke'

Thompson's fine from parents 'a joke'
March 25, 2013, 3:30 pm
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Mychal Thompson was the No. 1 overall pick in the 1978 NBA Draft. (USA TODAY IMAGES)

Programming note: Warriors-Lakers coverage kicks off tonight with Warriors Pregame Live at 7 PT on Comcast SportsNet Bay Area.

OAKLAND -- Following a $35,000 fine for his role in the Warriors' skirmish with Indiana on Feb. 26, Warriors guard Klay Thompson was just as surprised as anyone to hear that his father, former NBA player Mychal Thompson, announced Klay would receive an additional fine on his Los Angeles radio show.

Apparently, the elder Thompson, who played 13 years in the NBA and serves as the analyst on Los Angeles Lakers radio broadcasts, didn't approve of his son's minimal involvement in the tussle that led to suspensions for David Lee and Indiana's Roy Hibbert.

“He will [figure it out] when he sees that cash envelope show up a little short this week,” Mychal joked on ESPN LA, 710 am.

But that's all it was. A joke.

"I thought it was just funny," Klay said. "He's always been a joker, so I got a good laugh from it."

[REWIND: Parents slap Warriors' Thompson with second fine]

With the Warriors set to host the Lakers Monday at Oracle Arena, Mychal Thompson will be back behind the microphone ready to provide color commentary for a game involving his son for the third time this year. Klay hasn't listened to a copy of any of the previous calls -- "It'd be weird," he said -- but he's no stranger to his father's analysis of the Warriors and his play, in particular.

Not surprisingly, basketball is a hot topic during their several conversations each week during the season and Mychal isn't shy about letting his son know his thoughts.

"Oh yeah, he tells me what I've been doing good," Klay said, "and what he thinks I can do better."

It's somewhat of an enviable position for Warriors coach Mark Jackson, who spent several years as a broadcaster after his playing career was over and has a son, Mark Jackson Jr., who plays basketball at Manhattan College.

"You pinch yourself if you're in that situation, looking at your son," Jackson said. "You've watched him dream of being in that position. It's a heck of an accomplishment and a great statement for both guys."