Warriors' cap situation less than ideal

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Warriors' cap situation less than ideal

There are still details to emerge from the NBAs newcollective bargaining agreement, but the framework of the deal is coming intofocus.And what Warriors fans will see when its all said and doneis something that doesnt look a whole lot different from the old system.With free agency a little more than a week away, it seemsapparent the Warriors wont be big players in the market, unless, that is,owner Joe Lacob and his front office team are prepared to make a bold, riskymove.The bottom line is the Warriors appear to be in aless-than-optimal position not far enough under the salary cap to do majordamage and not over either, preventing them from using the mid-levelexception.The Warriors have committed more than 31 million to DavidLee, Monta Ellis and Andris Biedrins for the upcoming season. Theyve gotanother 12.5 million committed to Dorell Wright, Stephen Curry, Lou Amundsonand Ekpe Udoh.Thats approximately 43.5 million with the salary cap being58 million.Theyve also got Charlie Bell on the books for 4.1 million,and throw another 4 million in there for Klay Thompson, Jeremy Tyler, CharlesJenkins and Jeremy Lin.That puts the Warriors at about 51-plus million or about6-plus million under the cap. If the Warriors use their amnesty clause onBell, they could conceivably get 10 or 11 million under.While that sounds like a nice chunk of change, its stillprobably not enough to get a player such as Nene, considered perhaps the bestfree agent big man available. It is probably enough to get you Clippers centerDeAndre Jordan, but the Warriors would need to think long and hard aboutoffering him a contract in the 7- to 9 million range particularly withBiedrins still earning 9 million per.Even if the Warriors get to 11 million under, best casewould likely be acquiring two role players. Keep in mind, even teams above thecap will have the mid-level exception, worth 5 million in Year 1.Now, the Warriors could become a big player in the free agentmarket with one big-time move using the amnesty clause on David Lee or AndrisBiedrins. Making a move like that would give the Warriors big-time cap roomthis offseason, but would also leave them extremely short-handed in thefrontcourt and they were shorthanded when they were at full strength lastseason.In other words, if you amnesty Lee or Biedrins, you betterbe able to sign a frontcourt player better than the one you get rid of andthere are no assurances of that.It might behoove the Warriors to not use the amnestyprovision this year therefore remaining about 7 million under the cap. Thatwould give them more financial clout than teams with simply the mid-levelexception and they could still be bold next season or the year after andamnesty Lee or Biedrins.The Warriors are by no means in a dire situation when itcomes to the salary cap, their payroll and financial flexibility. But theyrefar from sitting pretty, either.

Reports: Weber, Hornets agree to deal hours after Warriors release him

Reports: Weber, Hornets agree to deal hours after Warriors release him

Briante Weber wasn't unemployed very long.

Less than 12 hours after the Warriors released him, the guard has reportedly agreed to sign a 10-day contract with the Charlotte Hornets.

News of the agreement was first reported by Yahoo Sports.

Weber's second 10-contract with the Warriors expired following Saturday's game against the Nets. Immediately after the contest, the team announced they were releasing the 24-year-old.

In seven games with the Warriors, Weber averaged 1.7 points, 0.7 assists and 0.6 rebounds in 6.6 minutes.

 

Warriors eye veteran guard Calderon after release of Weber

Warriors eye veteran guard Calderon after release of Weber

OAKLAND -- Briante Weber’s 20 days with the Warriors came to an end Saturday night, creating a roster opening expected to be filled by veteran point guard Jose Calderon.

“We think we have something in place, but it’s not finalized,” Warriors coach Steve Kerr said after a 112-95 victory over Brooklyn.

Calderon is in the process to be bought out by the Lakers, after which he will become a free agent. Once he clears waivers, the Warriors, according to multiple sources, will be waiting to offer a physical examination and a contract.

Though Warriors president/general manager Bob Myers stopped short of identifying Calderon by name, his insinuations late Saturday night line up with what was learned from league sources.

“You find that in the playoffs, experience matters,” Myers told CSNBayArea.com.

“I don’t want to diminish (Weber’s) contribution and say he’s not capable,” he added. “He could help a team. But I think sometimes you go with experience when going into the playoffs.”

While Weber is 24, with limited NBA experience, Calderon is 35 and has 12 seasons in the league, including three playoff appearances with two different teams. Moreover, Calderon is a career 41.1-percent 3-point shooter.

Calderon has played sparingly this season and has appeared only once, for five minutes, over the last nine games. In November, his most active month, he played in 11 games, averaging 5.5 points and 3.0 assists while shooting 54.5 percent from the field and 45.0 from beyond the arc.

Not that this made releasing Weber any easier. He had, in a short span of time, become popular with his teammates. Though Weber declined postgame interview requests, Stephen Curry spent a few minutes consoling and encouraging him.

Kerr struggled a bit in announcing that the team was releasing Weber, though the move was made by the front office in consultation with the coaching staff.

“We are making the decision thinking it’s the best thing for the team,” he said. “We make every decision based on that.

Weber played two minutes Saturday, scoring four points on 2-of-3 shooting. He logged a total of 46 minutes spread over seven games.

“He’s a good kid, did everything we asked of him,” Myers said. “But sometimes you’ve got to make tough decisions. Sometimes you’re not even right, but you make the best decision you can at the time.

“But he’s got a future in the NBA. He’ll have options. That’s the best thing about his situation. He’ll be able to choose what’s best for him.”