Warriors

Warriors self-destruct in 4th, fall to Grizzlies 91-90

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Warriors self-destruct in 4th, fall to Grizzlies 91-90

BOX SCORE

OAKLAND The Warriors had a 20-point lead late in the third quarter and 16-point lead heading into the fourth quarter, but squandered it away. Golden State committed nine turnovers in the final period and were outscored by the Grizzlies 39-22.

Grizzlies 91, Warriors 90Star of the game: Mike Conley scored nine of his 20 points in the fourth quarter, including six in the final three minutes to help the Grizzlies to their seventh win in a row.Turnovers galore: The Warriors committed 24 turnovers on the night including 12 combined by Monta Ellis and Stephen Curry which led to 27 Memphis points. The Warriors had nine turnovers in the fourth quarter, many of them leading to fastbreak points. The Grizzlies had 16 fastbreak points on the night all of them coming in the fourth quarter.You think its over and you begin to freestyle and ad-lib and all of a sudden you give a team hope and life, Warriors coach Mark Jackson said. To start that fourth quarter, we could have knocked them out and they would have been ready to play their bench guys and pretty much surrender. They got underneath our skin and we didnt respond individually or collectively.Key stretch: With the Warriors clinging to a three-point lead with less than three minutes to go, they committed turnovers on consecutive possessions, each leading to Memphis scores which gave Memphis its first lead since the first lead since 2-0.It boils down to youve got to take care of the basketball, Jackson said. And turnovers absolutely sap the energy of teams and we witnessed it tonight. That had an effect on how we were defending. It was just bad basketball. We just threw the ball all over the place.Biggest lead: Late in the third quarter, the Warriors led the Grizzlies 63-43. That 20-point lead was the Warriors biggest lead of the season. The Warriors were up 19 points against both Chicago and New York, Games Nos. 2 and 3 on the year.Still, it slipped away and turned into the most disappointing loss of the season.Sometimes you dont have to say anything, Jackson said. No speech, no sermon, no message. We all know what took place. You dont want to say anything spur of the moment and well reflect and then talk about it.Winless vs. West: The Warriors entered Mondays game having played only five games against Western Conference, the fewest amount of games against conference teams of any other team.With the loss, the Warriors are 0-6 against Western Conference teams, the only team in the league winless in that area. Mondays game against Memphis was the first of 15 consecutive games against the West.Grizzly start: Memphis was just 15-for-40 from the floor at halftime (37.5 percent), but if you take away its two leading scorers Rudy Gay and Marc Gasol it got even worse. A lot worse.Outside of those two players, the rest of the Grizzlies were shooting 20 percent (4-for-20).Defense first: The Warriors had their best defensive stretch of the season in quarter No. 1. They held the Grizzlies to just 27.3 percent shooting from the field (6-for-22) and forced them into five turnovers.The 13 points given up were a season-low for the Warriors for points in a first period.Getting critical: Warriors coach Mark Jackson remains optimistic about his team, but facts are facts and they were 5-10 before Mondays game against Memphis.Jackson said the Warriors are improving, but not fast enough at this point.What you dont want is to run out of time, Jackson said. There comes a point where you have to speed up the process and we are at that point. We have a great part of the schedule where we will be at home against some very good teams. But in our building you have to take care of business. This is going to be a great stretch for us to begin to show who we are and cement our identity.

For Draymond Green, protests can't be short-lived: 'We're screwed' if they end soon

For Draymond Green, protests can't be short-lived: 'We're screwed' if they end soon

OAKLAND -- Easing into a seat for an interview a half hour after the Warriors finished practice Monday, Draymond Green responded to the first six questions at decibels barely above a whisper.

There was candor on basketball matters, because there always is with Green, but the power forward’s tone was relatively relaxed.

Not until the next several questions, all related to America’s polarizing sociopolitical climate, did Green’s heart and mind lock into rhythm. Asked if he believes the current wave of protests against inequality will go away soon, his voice picked up volume and conviction.

“I hope not,” Green said. “If it goes away, then we still have a problem. So I hope it’s not going away in a few weeks. Then we’ve missed the message again.

“So, no, I don’t think it’ll be gone away in a few weeks. And I pray that it’s not, because it’s not a problem that can be fixed in a few weeks. So, no, it shouldn’t be gone in a few weeks.”

Green acknowledged that he did not see the demonstrations that were spread across the NFL landscape on Sunday. He was, he said, out shopping and enjoying the day with his children.

He was aware that some teams stayed in the locker room during the anthem, that others knelt on the sidelines and that some linked arms. Being aware was not enough for Green to feel comfortable addressing that aspect.

But he’s very familiar with the subject matter.

“You just have to stand for what you believe in,” Green said during an answer than lasted more than two full minutes. “What everyone else may believe in, you may not believe in.”

Articulating the difference between the life of the athlete and that of a soldier, Green explaining that he has the “utmost respect” for those in the military.

“I just hope that there can be an understanding that this isn’t against the military,” he said. “It’s not to disrespect anything they do. Because I think everyone respects what they do . . . I appreciate everything they do.”

It was evident, however, that Green is on the same page as those pushing for the progress that would make America great, allowing the country to live up to its pledges stated in the constitution and elsewhere.

That’s why he hopes this activism is not a trend but a movement.

“I’m not saying kneeling shouldn’t be gone,” Green said. “But this conversation, trying to make these changes, absolutely not. If it’s gone in a few weeks, we’re screwed.”

Kawhi Leonard asked about NBA's new 'Zaza Pachulia rule'

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USATI

Kawhi Leonard asked about NBA's new 'Zaza Pachulia rule'

Do you remember Game 1 of the 2017 Western Conference Finals?

A refresher: The Spurs led by 21 with about eight minutes remaining in the third quarter and Zaza Pachulia fouled Kawhi Leonard on a jump shot.

Leonard landed on Pachulia's foot, rolled his ankle (for the second time in a matter of minutes) and did not play again during the series (Leonard made both free throws and then left the game for good). 

At media day on Monday, Leonard was asked about the NBA's new rule for the 2017-18 season.

"Think it's good to protect the player from getting hurt," Leonard told reporters. "I think it's a good rule just for the defender to be cautious."

Months later, does Leonard believe Pachulia's play was dirty?

"It's over with now. Would just rather talk about the new season. If it was dirty, or if it wasn't, it's not gonna help anything right now."

What new rule?

As the Associated Press' Brian Mahoney wrote last week:

"NBA referees will be able to call flagrant or technical fouls on defenders who dangerously close on jump shooters without allowing them space to land, as Zaza Pachulia did on the play that injured Spurs star Kawhi Leonard in last season’s playoffs.

After calling a foul, officials will now be able to look at replay to determine if the defender recklessly positioned his foot in an unnatural way, which could trigger an upgrade to a flagrant, or a technical if there was no contact but an apparent attempt to injure."

When many in the basketball world called Pachulia's play dirty, the Warriors big man said: "That's really stupid."

The Warriors and Spurs meet for the first time this season on Nov. 2 in San Antonio.

Drew Shiller is the co-host of Warriors Outsiders and a Web Producer at NBC Sports Bay Area. Follow him on Twitter @DrewShiller