Warriors' Summer League review: Tyler

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Warriors' Summer League review: Tyler

Due to the lockout, the 2012 Summer League was Jeremy Tylers first opportunity to really showcase himself against younger players. He started the final 23 games in 2011-12, averaging over 20 minutes a game against veteran NBA centers. So five games in Las Vegas should have been Tylers coming out party as a young talent on the rise.

Not so much. Instead, Tyler barely averaged more minutes in summer league (15.5 mpg) than he did all of last season (13.5) for the Warriors. He fouled at a high rate -- 7.74 fouls per 40 minutes which would have put him second behind Larry Sanders among qualified NBA centers last season according to Hoopdata.com. That number is also worse than his rookie season total (5.9 fouls per 40 minutes).

He also continued some alarming shooting and rebounding trends. His defensive rebounding rate last season was 17.1 which put him 55th among 67 qualified centers. His defensive rebounding rate in four Summer League games was 5.06 -- meaning he collected around 5 percent of the available rebounds while he was on the floor.

His shooting numbers did improve in his four games in Las Vegas, but not to the desired level of an NBA center. Last season, he shot 42.1 percent from the field, but in his 23 starts, that number dropped to 41.2 percent. Those shooting numbers put him in the bottom 10 in the league among qualified centers. In four summer league games, he shot 45.0 percent from the field which was partially saved by a 6-10 game against Miami. For some context, the league average among centers last season was 50.3 percent.

Tyler is a below average, but not a terrible finisher around the rim. According to Hoopdata.com, his 58.5 FG percent at the rim in his rookie season was about 6 percentage points below league average for centers. His shooting really suffered when he moved any distance from the basket. A little over half his shots per game were from 3 to 23 feet away from the basket where he shot a measly 28.6 percent.

The caveat with all Summer League analysis is the incredibly small sample size, but seeing the same alarming trends out of a player after three-and-a-half months of offseason workout time is not encouraging. Coming into this season it will be interesting to see if Tyler sees any time behind Andrew Bogut, Andris Biedrins, and Festus Ezeli.

For the sake of this analysis, 10-plus games played at 10-plus minutes per game will qualify a player.

Steve Kerr responds to notion Andre Iguodala's hip strain a white lie

Steve Kerr responds to notion Andre Iguodala's hip strain a white lie

On Tuesday morning, the Warriors announced that Andre Iguodala would not play against the Mavs because of a left hip strain

"I would go with 'hip' every single night I was looking to rest a player from now on," 95.7 The Game's Damon Bruce said to Steve Kerr on Wednesday. "A little white lie goes a long way. Is it safe to say that Andre Iguodala's 'hip' is gonna look fantastic come Friday?

"I understand where you're going with this, but this was not a white lie," Kerr said in response. "Andre has had hip tightness the last three days or so.

"He played through it in Oklahoma City. And Chelsea Lane, our physical therapist, told me after the game 'Andre really needed the night off. It would be great to knock this thing out over the next few days, so let's give him tomorrow off.'

"And I always listen to the training staff ... hopefully this will knock out any potential injury."

[RATTO: With resting players, there's one obvious solution for Adam Silver, NBA]

On Monday night in Oklahoma City, recorded six points, four rebounds, four assists, two steals and a block in about 22 minutes off the bench.

Through his first 57 appearances this season, Iguodala averaged 25.7 minutes per game. Since Kevin Durant's injury, Iguodala is averaging 29.1 minutes per game.

How much influence do trainers and/or physical therapists have in determining if a player suits up or takes a night off?

"Coaches have always had to rely on the medical staff to help them with the decision-making process," Kerr explained. "I think where we've made progress is in the amount of information that we have. As a coach, my job is to kind of gauge where the players are. But we have a lot more knowledge now with some of the technology where the training staff actually can measure how fatigued a player is.

"I think it's a little easier these days for the training staff to come to the coach and recommend something and have some data to back it up."

Kerr is an advocate for reducing the number of games in the regular season, but he understands that's not a reality.

"I don't think that's gonna happen," he said. "I think it would be great, honestly, if they cut it back to 75 games ... but, let's be honest, there's a lot of revenue at stake."

Report: W's encouraged by KD's rehab, hopeful for regular season return

Report: W's encouraged by KD's rehab, hopeful for regular season return

When the Warriors announced the severity of Kevin Durant's knee injury, they did not rule out a return before the end of the regular season.

And based on the progress of his rehab, the team is "hopeful" but "cautiously optimistic" that Durant will indeed play before the end of the regular season, according to ESPN.

The Warriors have 11 games remaining on their schedule and their final regular season game is April 12 against the Lakers.

On Tuesday, prior to the Warriors game against Dallas, Durant was seen working out on the court and putting up jump shots.

Just a day earlier, Durant worked up a good sweat while riding a stationary bike in Oklahoma City.

Durant is expected to be re-evaluated by the Warriors' medical staff next week.

After initially struggling without Durant, the Warriors have won five straight games. Durant sat on the bench for the road wins in Oklahoma City and Dallas.

Over the weekend, Warriors PG Stephen Curry and PF Draymond Green addressed Durant's recovery.

“You can tell he’s making improvements and following the game plan,” Curry told the media. “I see him in the weight room doing cardio stuff trying to stay as close to game shape as he can while he’s hurt. You like to see improvements every day. We still don’t know when he’ll be back.”

“When he’s ready, we’ll know,” Green told the media. “But it’s not really our job to try to figure out every day how he’s doing. You can kind of see he’s getting better and you just leave it at that.”