Warriors

Zeller: 'It would be great to be picked at No. 7

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Zeller: 'It would be great to be picked at No. 7

North Carolina center Tyler Zeller was in Oakland on Monday, working out for the Warriors in advance of the June 28 NBA draft.Zeller, 7-feet and 255 pounds, was part of a group that also included Baylors Perry Jones III, Kentuckys Terrence Jones and Vanderbilts Festus Ezeli.Zeller averaged 16.3 points and 9.6 rebounds per game as a senior for the Tar Heels, and he runs the floor extremely well for a big man. Zeller was the ACC player of the year as a senior, the first Tar Heel to do so since Phil Ford in 1978.The Warriors have the No. 7 pick in the draft, and could use the selection on Zeller. However, most mock drafts have Zeller going after the Warriors select at No. 7.A more likely scenario involving Zeller would be for the Warriors to trade their No. 7 pick and move back a few slots, with the possibility of selecting Zeller in the teens or so.Zeller has a nice outside touch, and said on Monday that he is beginning to add an NBA 3-pointer to his game.

Steve Kerr: Warriors 'the most unselfish team around, but...'

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AP

Steve Kerr: Warriors 'the most unselfish team around, but...'

The Warriors held Media Day on Friday and opened training camp on Saturday.

After Sunday's practice, Steve Kerr was asked about the team's on-court agenda.

"We're trying to address areas where we can get better; build on the areas where we're already strong," Kerr began. "The good thing is, we have so many players back it's not taking long to install things because everybody is pretty comfortable with what we're doing.

"But we're getting pretty specific with passing accuracy. We're trying to improve on our actual fundamentals -- passing the ball. We want to layer our offense a little bit -- add some options on stuff that we already do."

Last year, Golden State led the league with 30.4 assists per game (the Nuggets were second at 25.3).

The Warriors racked up at least 35 assists in a game 18 times.

"We are the most unselfish team around but we're probably an average passing team in terms of our fundamentals," Kerr said. "Our guys see everything and they move and they pass and they cut; they're totally unselfish. But you see on tape a lot a guy catching the ball at his shoe laces instead of in his shooting pocket.

"There's a dramatic difference in makes and misses when you get a bad pass or a good pass."

Kerr is right, but ... what a problem to have.

Drew Shiller is the co-host of Warriors Outsiders and a Web Producer at NBC Sports Bay Area. Follow him on Twitter @DrewShiller

Swaggy 3s: Warriors send 'shoot it, shoot it, shoot it' message to Nick Young

Swaggy 3s: Warriors send 'shoot it, shoot it, shoot it' message to Nick Young

OAKLAND -- Meanwhile, the Warriors are preparing to defend their NBA championship.

With most inquiries and discussion over the past three days related to the growing conflict between President Donald Trump and professional athletes, with the Warriors being central to the topic, their first preseason game looms on Saturday.

If one thing rang clear after practice Sunday, it’s that coaches and players want Nick Young to be the shooter they wanted when they signed him in July.

Through the first two practices, Young has been such a reluctant shooter that Andre Iguodala and some of the incumbent Warriors have been urging him to shoot.

“I’ve been saying the same thing to Nick -- shoot it, shoot it, shoot it,” coach Steve Kerr said Sunday after practice. “The whole thing for any of our new guys to understand is we want the first good shot we can find. If we don’t have a good shot, try to get a great shot.

“Let’s keep the ball moving, but be aggressive and find that balance. I don’t want Nick out there thinking. He’s one of the best shooters in the league and he should let it fly every time he’s open.”

Through the first two practices, it seems Young is more concerned with adapting to a new culture.

“I found myself passing a little bit more than normal today,” he said, chuckling. “It felt good, as long as I was getting some assists.”

That’s not why the Warriors hired the reserve guard after four seasons with the Lakers. Bench scoring was a visible weakness last season, and Young has averaged double figures in scoring in six of the last seven seasons.

He is particularly fond of the 3-point shot, having taken more triples than 2-point shots in each of the past two seasons. Young shot 40.4 percent from deep last season in Los Angeles.

Given the talent around Young now, and the fact that the 10-year veteran will be facing fellow reserves, he can expect to have even greater scoring opportunities.

“I’ve been getting a lot of open 3s,” Young said. “I’ve got to get used to not having somebody guarding me that much, get used to being in that corner for a while.”

In all likelihood, the Warriors won’t have to cajole Young much longer. He has developed during his 10-year career a reputation for chucking ‘em up. So, in all likelihood, the Warriors won’t have to do much more cajoling.

“Everybody’s going full speed,” Young said. “The more I get used to the plays, the more the shots will be open. I’m just in everybody’s way right now.”