Why Phelps called teenage female swimmer 'a stud'

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Why Phelps called teenage female swimmer 'a stud'

From Comcast SportsNet Monday, August 15, 2011
If Missy Franklins mind wanders as she sits in her advanced placementliterature class this week in suburban Denver, the 16-year-old swimmer will haveplenty of summer memories to entertain her.Maybe shell remember winning three gold medals at her first worldchampionships in China. Or setting two American records in the process. Or beingpresented with a 20,000 check as the top points earner on the grand prixcircuit, beating out the likes of Michael Phelps and Ryan Lochte.I had the best summer I could ever ask for, she said recently. Franklin emerged as a budding star of the U.S. team, someone who can swimmultiple events and anchor the pressure-packed relays even though shes barelylearned to drive.All of us are so impressed with her, 11-time Olympic medalist NatalieCoughlin said. She has the maturity to handle the pressure.Three years ago, Franklin was an unknown 13-year-old and the second-youngestswimmer at the U.S. Olympic trials, competing in three events.At next years trials, expect Franklins name to be all over the heat sheetsas she plans to qualify in the maximum 13 events. She wont swim them all; shejust loves the challenge of achieving such an audacious goal.Sounds like a female Phelps, right?Its hard to compare yourself to someone who is that unbelievable at whathe does, Franklin said, so right now Im just going to stick to swimming myraces and just being me and having fun with it.Phelps certainly noticed her in Shanghai, saying, Shes never tired, shesalways swimming fast. Shes a stud.At 6-foot-1, with big hands and size 13 feet, Franklin cuts an imposingfigure on the blocks. Shes got a catchy nicknameMissile Missybestowedby her dad four years ago. Out of the water, she has a cant-miss smilerevealing a mouth full of braces.Im trying to get them off as soon as possible, she said. Its justreally annoying.Thats about the only thing that gets the relentlessly upbeat Franklin down.She cracked up her teammates in China with her excited approach to swimming themorning prelims, her dancing ability at training camp, and her bubblypersonality.Its unbelievably refreshing to have her energy on this team, Coughlinsaid.Franklin thrived on being accepted by her teammates, whose gold-medalstandards she hopes to live up to at the London Olympics.When you have this little annoying 16-year-old thrown in the mix of allthese incredible swimmers, its really special that they would take the time totalk to me and wish me good luck and say congratulations, she said.Franklin followed up her five-medal performance at worlds by winning herfirst two national titles days after returning from China earlier this month.Her winning time of 53.63 seconds in the 100-meter freestyle was fifth-fastestin the world this year and would have earned her a bronze medal in the event inShanghai.Her club coach, Todd Schmitz, gets as much of a workout on deck as Franklindoes in the pool. He jumps up and down during her races as he urges her on.The best thing about it is it kind of feels like hes swimming the racewith you, she said, which I always love because I know that hes probablygoing to be just as tired as I am when I get out.There are times when Franklin is the one calming Schmitz down on her way tothe blocks.Sometimes she looks at me and says, Coach, its OK, he said. Shesreally good at controlling her emotions.The memories of repeated trips to the awards podium and hearing the nationalanthem will stoke Franklins motivation during the months of training that lieahead.Just thinking about that moment gets my heart pumping and my adrenalineracing, she said. If you ever have a hard set or a hard practice, its sogood to think back about how happy you were and just really help push yourselfthrough it.For now, shes focused on her junior year at Regis Jesuit, a privateCatholic high school in Aurora, Colo. Franklin didnt accept the grand prixprize money so she could retain her college eligibility.Besides AP literature, theres an AP U.Sworld history class, along with twoelectives and French that shell take online.Its going to be tough, she said. Im just going to have fun and tryto keep everything under control.She cant wait to test out her newly licensed driving skills, too. She plansto keep her car keys on the green-and-blue lanyard on which her credential hungat worlds.Franklin gave her two golds from nationals to the kids who carried thebaskets with the swimmers gear from the blocks.They loved it, so thats really sweet for me to see, she said.With Phelps headed for retirement after London, the United States will be inneed of its next big star in the pool. With her versatility, maturity andcharisma, Franklin seems more than capable of filling the bill.Shes what youre supposed to be, said Jack Bauerle, who coached theU.S. women at worlds. She makes everybody on the team a little bit better,cares about everybody else and really has an innocence about her that she justloves to race.

49ers 2017 UDFA tracker: Southern Miss QB reportedly agrees to terms

49ers 2017 UDFA tracker: Southern Miss QB reportedly agrees to terms

SANTA CLARA – The 49ers are reportedly adding a fourth quarterback to their 90-man roster.

Nick Mullens a four-year starter at Southern Mississippi, agreed to terms with the 49ers after the conclusion of the Saturday’s NFL draft, he told the Hattiesburg American.

As a senior, Mullens completed 65.5 percent of his passes for 3,272 yards with 24 touchdowns and 11 interceptions.

Mullens joins a quarterback group that includes starter Brian Hoyer, backup Matt Barkley and third-round draft pick C.J. Beathard.

Other reported 49ers free-agent agreements include:

--RB Matt Breida, Georgia Southern: In three seasons at Georgia Southern, Breida rushed for 3,740 yards and 37 touchdowns while averaging 6.9 yards a carry. (Tampa Bay Times)

--OL Erik Magnuson, Michigan: Magnuson (6-6, 305) was a first-team All-Big Ten performer who started every game at right tackle. He announced on Twitter that he has agreed to terms with the 49ers.

--WR Kendrick Bourne, Eastern Washington: He caught 211 passes for 3,130 yards and 27 touchdowns in his four-year career. Bourne (6-1, 203) had his best season as a senior, with 79 receptions for 1,201 yards and seven touchdowns. Eastern Washington announced Bourne’s three-year contract.

--OT Darrell Williams Jr., Western Kentucky: Williams (6-5, 315) started 41 games. He played his final two seasons at right tackle after moving from right guard. Western Kentucky announced the contract agreement with the 49ers.

--WR KD Cannon, Baylor: Cannon caught 195 passes for 3,113 and 27 touchdowns in his three-year career. He turned pro after a junior season in which he caught 87 passes for 1,215 yards and 13 touchdowns. He announced his contract agreement with the 49ers via Twitter.

Livingston on Kerr: 'He’s our leader ... somebody that we count on'

Livingston on Kerr: 'He’s our leader ... somebody that we count on'

OAKLAND -- Though much has been said about the agonies and challenges facing Steve Kerr, including speculation about when, or if, he’ll return as head coach of the Warriors, little has been put into words that capture the significance of his absence.

This is perhaps because it can be difficult to explain how one man is able to influence a roster of supremely talented athletes, at the wealthiest point of life, with wildly divergent personalities, at different career stages.

Veteran guard Shaun Livingston, a man who knows perspective as well as anyone in the NBA, took a moment Saturday to cut through the palaver and pity to offer a clear and vivid illustration of Kerr’s value as a man and as a coach.

“It’s just his presence, his personality,” Livingston began. “His character, the way he fits in with us. He’s kind of the battery pack, in the sense that he makes everybody go. He keeps us all (in harmony), everybody from staff, training staff, coaching staff to the players.

“He bridges the gaps, in the sense of communication, and he makes it light.”

In short, Kerr’s value to the franchise is far greater than his duties as a coach. He has an easy, breezy charisma insofar as he’s so comfortable submerging his own ego while being remarkably good at making everyone matter.

Moreover, Kerr is decidedly inclusive, explicitly emphatically open to ideas. He’s an outreach specialist whose sensibilities are contagious.

All of which helps create a sprightly and genial workplace, something the Warriors sought when they hired Kerr to replace the swaggering and dogmatic Mark Jackson in May 2014.

“Every day it’s something new, in a sense, and that’s hard to do,” Livingston said. “We’re here for six to nine months for the past couple years, seeing the same faces. So it is kind of like a job. But (Kerr) makes it more like a game and tries to make sure we’re enjoying ourselves out there.”

Kerr wants to live his life and coach basketball around four basic tenets: joy, mindfulness, compassion and competition. Maintaining a balance of the four can be difficult, especially when Kerr is dealing with the searing pain that has him on the sideline for an indefinite period.

But Kerr never strays far. His players seem to see and, more important, feel that.

Draymond Green and Kerr, each volatile in his own way, don’t always see eye-to-eye. Yet Green on several occasions has noted that Kerr “always seems to find the right thing to say, at the right time.”

Veteran David West points out that anyone who spends any time around Kerr can sense his basic humanity. Veteran Andre Iguodala, one of the team’s co-captains, speaks of Kerr’s curiosity and desire to broaden his horizons.

Stephen Curry, the other co-captain, kept the ball from the Warriors’ Game 4 win over Portland last Monday night, punctuating a series sweep, and gave it to Kerr, who missed Games 3 and 4 while coping with this prolonged post-surgery pain.

Lead assistant Mike Brown, the acting head coach in Kerr’s absence, concedes he has benefited from being around Kerr and this team.

“The tone he sets is the best I’ve been around,” said Brown, who has been involved in the NBA since 1992. “This is a special, special situation, and he’s big reason why.”

So it’s not just Livingston who throwing rose petals at the boss. He just happened to convey in a few words the effect Kerr has on the team and within the building.

“He’s our leader,” Livingston said. “He’s somebody that we count on.”