Giants acquire Scutaro from Rockies

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Giants acquire Scutaro from Rockies

SAN FRANCISCO The Giants added infield depth and a seasoned right-handed contact man for their bench, acquiring Marco Scutaro from the Colorado Rockies in exchange for Triple-A second baseman Charlie Culberson.

The Rockies are sending cash to offset at least a portion of the roughly 2.5 million owed to Scutaro, who will be a free agent after this season.

The Giants were light on right-handed hitters who have experience off the bench; theyre getting an old hand in Scutaro, 36, who was hitting .271 with a .324 on-base percentage along with four home runs in 411 plate appearances.

Its worth pointing out that Scutaro was hitting just .238 with a weak .292 slugging percentage away from Coors this year.

I understand its a business, Scutaro told the Denver Post. Now I have an opportunity for a team that has a chance to make the playoffs."

Giants manager Bruce Bochys club had little depth behind second baseman Ryan Theriot aside from light-hitting Emmanuel Burriss, whose place on the roster is far from safe in the wake of this trade.

Scutaro is best known in the Bay Area for being the As starting shortstop for most of his tenure with the club from 2004-07. Hes also played for the Mets, Blue Jays and Red Sox.

Culberson, 23, made his major league debut earlier this season and was sent back after hitting .136 in six games. He was hitting .236 with 10 home runs and 53 RBIs in 90 games for Triple-A Fresno. A Rockies scout told me that he likes Culberson and wrote him up as a solid big league contributor.

Culberson was a sandwich-round pick (51st overall) in the 2007 draft.

The Scutaro trade is probably what held up the Giants from activating Aubrey Huff from the disabled list prior to Fridays game. The club could be poised to make several roster moves in the coming hours.

Keep checking CSNBayArea.com for the latest.

Ex-Giants 3B signs deal with Yomiuri Giants in Japan

Ex-Giants 3B signs deal with Yomiuri Giants in Japan

TOKYO — Former Detroit Tigers infielder Casey McGehee has agreed to a one-year deal with the Yomiuri Giants of Japan's Central League worth $1.7 million.

The Giants announced the signing on their official website on Sunday.

McGehee played in 30 games for the Tigers in 2016 posting a .228 batting average.

This will be McGehee's second stint in Japan. In 2013, he batted .292 with 28 home runs and 93 RBI while helping the Rakuten Eagles of the Pacific League win the Japan Series.

The 34-year-old can play either first or third base.

Evans: Giants want to give Parker, Williamson chance to play, but...

Evans: Giants want to give Parker, Williamson chance to play, but...

While the Giants aggressively pursue a new closer, they haven't been aggressive for a new left fielder.

Angel Pagan is a free agent and isn't likely to come back. That leaves talented, but unproven youngsters Mac Williams and Jarrett Parker.

And for GM Bobby Evans, who is always looking for ways to improve the roster, it appears he is content going into the 2017 with Williamson and Parker filling the void in left field.

"Our mindset has been to keep an open mind in any way we can improve the club offensively. But that said, I feel like we've got a starting lineup today that we don't have to adjust or improve upon. I'd always like to find ways to improve it. I think there are some big market options, but we've got two young guys that we want to get a good evaluation on, and you can't really do that until they get major league at-bats. That's Mac Williamson and Jarrett Parker and both of them are really in-waiting for an opportunity to get everyday playing time and show what they can do," Evans told ESPN's Buster Olney on Friday.

But Evans is keeping an open mind regarding acquiring a left fielder.

"That said, I also have to make sure that if we have an opportunity to improve or solidify our lineup in some way, I want to take advantage of it. But I can't lose sight of the benefit of developing our own guys and giving them a chance and not locking ourselves into keeping them from playing time in the next two to three years" Evans said.