Giants add 25 on final day of draft

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Giants add 25 on final day of draft

Day 3 of the 2012 MLB First-Year Player Draft passed Wednesday. In all, the Giants drafted 21 pitchers, four catchers, seven infielders and eight outfielders. San Francisco chose 31 college players, four junior college players and five from high school.

The Giants selected seven players with Northern California roots, including second round pick, RHP Martin Agosta, St. Marys College (Jesuit HS, Sacramento, CA), outfielder Ryan Tella, University of Auburn (Irvington HS, Fremont, CA), Mitch Delfino, University of California, Berkeley (Cloverdale HS, Santa Rosa, CA), LHP Zachariah Edgington, University of California, Santa Barbara (Juniperro Serra HS, San Mateo, CA), Daniel Grazzini, College of San Mateo (De La Salle HS, Concord, CA), Clint Terry, College of San Mateo, Drew Jackson, Miramonte HS (Orinda, CA) and Tyler Ferguson, Clovis West HS (Fresno, CA).

A full list of the Giants' selections in the 2012 First-year Player Draft:

Rd Pick Name Pos School HT WT BT Birthdate
1 20 Stratton, Chris RHP Miss. St. 6-3 190 RR 8221990
2 84 Agosta, Martin RHP St. Marys 6-2 175 RR 471991
3 115 Williamson, Johnathan RF Wake Forest 6-4 245 RR 7151990
4 148 Okert, Steven LHP Oklahoma 6-2 210 LL 791991
5 178 Blach, Ty LHP Creighton 6-1 200 RL 10201990
6 208 Johnson, Stephen RHP St. Edwards 6-4 205 RR 2211991
7 238 Encinosa, Eduardo RHP Miami 6-5 230 RR 851991
8 268 Kurrasch, Joseph LHP Penn St. 6-2 205 LL 6191991
9 298 McCall, Shilo CF Piedra Vista HS 6-0 210 RR 621994
10 328 Brown, Trevor C UCLA 6-2 190 RR 11151991
11 358 Tella, Ryan CF Auburn 6-0 175 LL 5181991
12 388 Sy, Jeremy SS Louisiana Monroe 5-11 180 RR 10141989
13 418 Jones, Ryan 2B Michigan St. 5-11 170 RR 981990
14 448 Hollick, Tyler CF Chandler CC 6-1 185 LR 9161992
15 478 Rojas, Leonardo C Miami Dade CC 5-10 175 RR 6111990
16 508 Gardeck, Ian RHP Alabama 6-2 225 RR 11211990
17 538 Johnson, Christopher RHP Portland 6-4 205 RR 8241991
18 568 Duffy, Matthew SS Long Beach St. 6-2 170 RR 1151991
19 598 Zeigler, Randall LHP Louisiana Monroe 6-1 183 LL 8301989
20 628 Delfino, Mitchell 3B UC Berkeley 6-2 210 RR 1131991
21 658 Turner, Benjamin C Missouri 6-5 225 RR 4271990
22 688 Metzger, Brennan CF Long Beach St. 5-11 180 RR 12151989
23 718 Leenhouts, Andrew LHP Northeastern 6-3 200 LL 3281990
24 748 Cain, Andrew CF UNC-Wilmington 6-6 220 RR 3241990
25 778 Eberle, Sam C Jacksonville St. 6-0 215 RR 211990
26 808 McVay, Mason LHP Florida Int. 6-7 240 LL 8151990
27 838 Fern, Chris LHP Union College 6-4 215 LL 8221991
28 868 Rapp, Joseph 1B Louisiana Monroe 6-3 220 RR 11271989
29 898 Houck, Shayne OF Kutzton University 6-1 210 RR 5291990
30 928 Blanchard, Michael CF Austin Peay St. 6-0 180 RR 811989
31 958 Forjet, Jason RHP Fla Gulf Coast 6-2 185 RR 141990
32 988 Pickering, Christopher LHP U. Rhode Island 6-1 190 LL 2211989
33 1018 Farley, Brandon RHP Arkansas St. 6-2 215 RR 811990
34 1048 Edgington, Zachariah LHP UCSB 6-0 190 LL 12211989
35 1078 Grazzini, Daniel RHP Col. San Mateo 6-3 195 LR 821992
36 1108 Terry,Clint LHP Col. San Mateo 6-2 195 LL 691992
37 1138 Jackson, Drew SS Miramonte HS 6-2 175 RR 7281993
38 1168 Long, Nolan RHP Waterford HS 6-9 225 RR 1191994
39 1198 Fagan, Kevin 2B N. Broward Prep 5-11 175 LR 591994
40 1228 Ferguson, Tyler RHP Clovis West HS 6-4 225 RR 1051993
Courtesy San Francisco Giants media services

What they're saying: 2017 Baseball Hall of Fame class

What they're saying: 2017 Baseball Hall of Fame class

The National Baseball Hall of Fame inducted Jeff Bagwell, Tim Raines and Ivan Rodriguez Wednesday. Here's what they and their peers are saying.

https://twitter.com/baseballhall/status/821855144681897988


Still on outside, Bonds, Clemens have become invaluable to Hall

Still on outside, Bonds, Clemens have become invaluable to Hall

The Baseball Hall of Fame becomes yesterday’s news Friday, as it always does. Three months of buildup, one day to announce the names, one day to castigate the voters for their willfully negligent slights, and then nine months of hibernation.

So much for the concept of “joining the immortals.”

But at least Jeff Bagwell, Tim Raines and Ivan Rodriguez never have to go through this annual pageant of nonsense again.

Barry Bonds does, though, and so does Roger Clemens, and to a lesser extent, so does Curt Schilling. They are the new litmus strips for the Hall, and they will more than replace Raines (voter ignorance division) and Bagwell (presumption of guilt with evidence division) for self-involved debate.

And in that adjusted role from doomed outsiders to serious candidates, Bonds and Clemens – and to a lesser extent again, Schilling – have become invaluable to the Hall, and their eventual election and induction will reduce the Hall’s ability to inflame passions outside the seamhead community.

On a day when Bagwell and Raines finally cleared the 75 percent threshold and Bonds and Clemens moved from 45 percent to 53.8 and 54.1 percent, respectively, the Hall of Fame Debating And Chowder Society saw the end times for its power as a multi-month debate-churner.

The blatherers are dead, long live the blatherers.

An entire mini-industry of Hall watchers has been spawned, in part by the now-feted Ryan Thibodaux and his exit polling but also by the debates about what the Hall should be and who should get to decide it. It has made days like Wednesday event viewing when it hadn’t been for years. For that, the Hall owes Bonds and Clemens a debt that the powers inside Major League Baseball wishes it didn’t have to pay. But the day they are inducted is the day that PEDs die as a debating point. The answer will have been provided, and there will be no more need for discussion.

Worse yet, the BBWAA’S new voter transparency rules may unfortunately impact our pal Thibodaux, whose seminal work in this understudied area of social science undermined ballot secrecy. In short, if everyone has to fess up, the desperate need to know early returns may dry up.

Oh, there will always be the day of post mortem-ization, as those who didn’t clear the threshold are subject to a few rounds of the popular parlor game, “Who Got Snubbed, And The Tedious And Half-Informed Reasons Why.”

For instance, the big debating point from today’s results will not be about Raines and Guerrero getting in, but what happened to the Bonds and Clemens votes. People have already postulated that a lot of the jump in their respective votes can be directly linked to Bud Selig’s election from the Veterans Committee. Voters who had previously ridden the Hall-as-temple argument suddenly lost their raison d’etre and realized that the PED problem was an industry matter rather than a greedy players’ matter.

In short, they saw Selig getting in as tacit approval that the PED issue was no longer a moral one in baseball but a cynical one, a way to blame labor for management’s culpability. That is an irony whose existence Selig will almost surely deny, but it’s there anyway, and it represents one more non-glacial change in a system that has been nearly immovable for most of its existence.

The next change, of course, may be removing the vote from the BBWAA and turning it over to a more malleable panel of “experts” who may not skew as young and values-neutral as the BBWAA of the future seems to be heading. That course may be hastened if/when Bonds and Clemens are elected, because halls of fame in their more traditional role have been more about rewarding friends and punishing enemies, and a large and shifting electorate makes that harder to accomplish.

The argument against such a course, though, is that the current system of three months of fevered public debate about the same old stuff works for the Hall’s sense of its importance. I mean, MLB Network and its fetish for shrill argument only has so much reach.

By Friday, though, all of this will revert to its typically inert state. Bonds, Clemens (ATALE Schilling), PEDs, morality, practicality, secrecy, old voter/young voter – all of it will fade back into insignificance.

And in a year or two or maybe three, Bonds and Clemens will wipe it all out by being included in the one club that we once knew would never tolerate their presence, and the Hall Of Fame’s Golden Age Of Shrieking Argument will end.

In a weird and largely unpleasant way, it will be missed.