Al's rage would have powered a neighborhood

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Al's rage would have powered a neighborhood

Jerry Jones angrily pounded the Dallas locker room door after the Cowboys latest eggy performance. Bud Adams essentially threw his entire Tennessee Titans team under the road grader he was driving for giving up 51 to Chicago.But there was not a sound in Oakland, where the Raiders let Doug Martin become a household name. In other words, just one more reason to wish Al Davis was still around.Not that he would have said anything after Sundays 42-32 loss to Tampa Bay, mind you. He reserved that level of entertainment for coaches hirings and firings, so he averaged a performance a year for the last 10.But his rage would have powered a neighborhood, and the walls at Raiders Intergalactic Headquarters would have bled for days. Youd have known he was there. Damn straight you would have.This is something we get too little of these days. The new generation of sporting entrepreneur is good at hiding from the public eye, hiring people to explain his (or her) whims and demands without him ever having to pop up at all.The old owners tended to stand out front more, doing odd things like taking responsibility and blowing off steam and shaking their fists and saying Why I oughta . . . The new ones want to lay in pile of money and dream of being holograms.In the Bay Area, the only owner who is eminently visible is Joe Lacob, who sits courtside, often with his arms folded across his chest and looking like he wishes he had heat vision. He is the Warriors, and the Warriors are him. And hell pretty well talk to anyone, any time.This could change, of course, if the Warriors overcome their quick start and settle into their much-predicted high-30s win projection. He is reaching that stage in his progression as an owner in which someone with a tape recorder or camera is more bother than opportunity.But he isnt there yet. And that makes him, well, special. Especially in these parts.

Mark Davis, who inherited the big chair from his father, fulminated privately Sunday if at all. Jed York leaves the football P.R. to Jim Harbaugh (and wouldnt you have killed to see him do the Raiders presser today?), though he will bloviate about the new stadium pretty much on command.The As and Giants exceeded expectations, the Giants winning it all, and other than celebratory moments, neither John-Boy Fisher nor Charlie Johnson made an appearance. Sharks front man Kevin Compton has spoken for the record once, before the lockout.In other words, Jones and Adams are old school. Lacob is kind of old school. The rest of them are . . . well, no school. They attend, but their participation in classroom discussion is nil.It is a safer place to be. Someone else deals with the outside world. Someone else has to handle the art of the spin. The value of invisibility is evident.But its also a little weak.The perfect owner is available for blame deflection after losses, even if its just to say, These are my guys, and theyre going to stay my guys. You want to yell, yell at me. After all, Im part of this too.The perfectly awful owner is available only for victories, to explain his (or her) magnificence when it is safe to do so.But the perpetually invisible owner resides in a netherworld where their very existence is really none of your business. Being above it all is a constant, and frankly, safety is boring.None of this will change, mind you. Our localities owners will occasionally be there when they need us, but never when we need them. They like that deal. Its the one where they win either way, and it explains their business practices in general. Thats how they got to be owners.But I speak for all America when I say that we could have used some public Mark Davis rage Sunday. It was a game that demanded it, frankly, and there are so few demands the Raiders make upon us otherwise.Ray Ratto is a columnist for CSNBayArea.com

Defense on the menu as Raiders enter 2017 NFL Draft

Defense on the menu as Raiders enter 2017 NFL Draft

The Raiders offense is stacked. It was before this offseason, when tight end Jared Cook, receiver Cordarrelle Patterson and offensive lineman Marshall Newhouse entered the mix.

Then Marshawn Lynch signed up on Wednesday and filled the last immediate offensive need.

The Raiders have talent and depth at most every offensive position, contrasting the defensive depth chart.

The Raiders need help there, possibly with a few instant impact players taken in this weekend’s NFL draft. The first round starts Thursday evening, with the next two rounds Friday afternoon and the remainder of this draft starting Saturday morning.

Despite clear needs, Reggie McKenzie says position is secondary to his ranking system.

“We’re going to take the best player,” McKenzie said in his pre-draft press conference. “There are some good defensive players in this draft, but we’re going to follow our board like always.”

The Raiders general manager says that could lead to an unexpected draft haul. At least he tried.

“Don’t be surprised if I draft all offensive players,” McKenzie said, unable to keep a straight face. “How about that?”

McKenzie knows his roster is strong, with clearly identifiable needs on defense. The Raiders need a starting inside linebacker. They need a slot cornerback. They need help rushing on the defensive interior. They need safety help.

McKenzie tried to fix some of those areas in free agency, but could find a match beyond weakside linebacker Jelani Jenkins. The draft offers the best opportunity to upgrade on defense, and volume could help fix that unit.

“Hopefully we can get a couple of defensive players that can help our team,” McKenzie said. “But, like we both said, we just want to help this football team, regardless of who comes at a spot whether it’s first or seventh round. And hopefully we get some good players after the draft. That’s the plan, we just want to keep stocking and let the chips fall.”

This draft is critical as the Raiders enter a new phase. He deconstructed the roster and reconstructed it while getting right with the salary cap. Now they need to extend members of the awesome 2014 draft class, including quarterback Derek Carr, guard Gabe Jackson and edge rusher Khalil Mack. Drafted quality must continue to cycle through to keep the team strong and the team’s competitive window open.

McKenzie must keep an eye on the horizon, though a few more quality players could push his unit into serious contention for a conference title.

“What we want as a team moving forward, we just want more impact players,” McKenzie said. “You can never have enough playmakers on both sides of the ball and depth on both sides. That’s when you come in and try to get you the best player who can do those things. We’re not just going to plug holes if that’s what you’re asking. We’re going to get some good football players regardless of who we have here.”

Marshawn Lynch excellent fit for Raiders scheme, ailing Oakland fan base

Marshawn Lynch excellent fit for Raiders scheme, ailing Oakland fan base

Marshawn Lynch is a Raider. He announced that fact on Twitter in his own unique way Wednesday, completing a month-long process from initial interest to final signature.

The Raiders gave him a new contract and traded Seattle for his rights, allowing the Oakland Tech High grad and Cal alum to come out of retirement and play for his hometown team.

That’s good news for Raiders fans on several fronts. He fills an immediate need at running back created when Latavius Murray left for Minnesota.

It temporarily tempers, though certainly doesn’t extinguish, rage about the Raiders relocating to Las Vegas.

[RATTO: Here's to hoping Marshawn Lynch upstages the NFL Draft]

Owner Mark Davis hopes to move his team when a new stadium is complete in 2020. 

Lynch won't be there. Lynch won’t represent Vegas. He’s an Oakland Raider, playing for the city he champions at every turn. Lynch regularly gives back to this community and might be its most popular native son right now.

Lynch missed playing football, but he wanted to represent his hometown. That was clear in his tweet. He explained it this way: “I’m really from Oakland doe like really really really from Oakland doe…town bizness breath on me.”

He’ll celebrate joining the Raiders on Thursday with a block party and autograph signing in Oakland.

Lynch will give East Bay fans something to cheer for that won’t be shipping off to Vegas in a few years.

Nothing can cure the pain of an NFL team leaving Oakland a second time. Wins are ibuprofen, giving short-term relief to an ailing fan local base. He can certainly help the Raiders provide that.

The Silver and Black needed a big, physical primary rusher to pair with elusive, yet smaller backs Jalen Richard and DeAndre Washington.

Lynch is that guy. There’s no question he’s a football fit.

Lynch is a strong interior rusher from several different formations. He could run well behind fullback Jamize Olawale, as a lone shotgun runner or in jumbo packages with quarterback Derek Carr under center and behind a hulking Raiders offensive line.

While new offensive coordinator Todd Downing will add some wrinkles to an existing scheme, the Raiders employ a versatile system that could suit Lynch’s many strengths.

Lynch ranks among the toughest, most aggressive backs of his generation and one of the best resisting tackles.

He averaged 4.3 yards per carry and 2.8 yards after contact per rushing attempt in his career, according to analytics site Pro Football Focus.

Lynch led the NFL with 245 broken tackles between 2013 and 2016 – 56 more than the next guy -- and he didn’t even play last season, per PFF.

He led the league with an unreal 3.1 yards after per contact in 2014, his last year fully healthy. He played just eight times in 2015 due to an abdominal injury that required surgery.

Lynch is completely healthy after his year travelling the world, doing charity work and expanding his clothing line, but effectiveness is always questioned of running backs over 30. Lynch turned 31 last week. He heads into his 10th season without having been hit in a while, and many believe he can produce like few others his age have in the NFL.

He’ll take the lion’s share of carries in a three-man rotation with Richard and Washington. He reportedly gets an extra $2 million if he's just the second Raider since 2010 to reach 1,000 yards. There’s motivation to push for that and other incentives in the deal. If Lynch is in vintage Beast Mode and fans are happy, the Raiders will gladly pay the extra freight.