Al's rage would have powered a neighborhood

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Al's rage would have powered a neighborhood

Jerry Jones angrily pounded the Dallas locker room door after the Cowboys latest eggy performance. Bud Adams essentially threw his entire Tennessee Titans team under the road grader he was driving for giving up 51 to Chicago.But there was not a sound in Oakland, where the Raiders let Doug Martin become a household name. In other words, just one more reason to wish Al Davis was still around.Not that he would have said anything after Sundays 42-32 loss to Tampa Bay, mind you. He reserved that level of entertainment for coaches hirings and firings, so he averaged a performance a year for the last 10.But his rage would have powered a neighborhood, and the walls at Raiders Intergalactic Headquarters would have bled for days. Youd have known he was there. Damn straight you would have.This is something we get too little of these days. The new generation of sporting entrepreneur is good at hiding from the public eye, hiring people to explain his (or her) whims and demands without him ever having to pop up at all.The old owners tended to stand out front more, doing odd things like taking responsibility and blowing off steam and shaking their fists and saying Why I oughta . . . The new ones want to lay in pile of money and dream of being holograms.In the Bay Area, the only owner who is eminently visible is Joe Lacob, who sits courtside, often with his arms folded across his chest and looking like he wishes he had heat vision. He is the Warriors, and the Warriors are him. And hell pretty well talk to anyone, any time.This could change, of course, if the Warriors overcome their quick start and settle into their much-predicted high-30s win projection. He is reaching that stage in his progression as an owner in which someone with a tape recorder or camera is more bother than opportunity.But he isnt there yet. And that makes him, well, special. Especially in these parts.

Mark Davis, who inherited the big chair from his father, fulminated privately Sunday if at all. Jed York leaves the football P.R. to Jim Harbaugh (and wouldnt you have killed to see him do the Raiders presser today?), though he will bloviate about the new stadium pretty much on command.The As and Giants exceeded expectations, the Giants winning it all, and other than celebratory moments, neither John-Boy Fisher nor Charlie Johnson made an appearance. Sharks front man Kevin Compton has spoken for the record once, before the lockout.In other words, Jones and Adams are old school. Lacob is kind of old school. The rest of them are . . . well, no school. They attend, but their participation in classroom discussion is nil.It is a safer place to be. Someone else deals with the outside world. Someone else has to handle the art of the spin. The value of invisibility is evident.But its also a little weak.The perfect owner is available for blame deflection after losses, even if its just to say, These are my guys, and theyre going to stay my guys. You want to yell, yell at me. After all, Im part of this too.The perfectly awful owner is available only for victories, to explain his (or her) magnificence when it is safe to do so.But the perpetually invisible owner resides in a netherworld where their very existence is really none of your business. Being above it all is a constant, and frankly, safety is boring.None of this will change, mind you. Our localities owners will occasionally be there when they need us, but never when we need them. They like that deal. Its the one where they win either way, and it explains their business practices in general. Thats how they got to be owners.But I speak for all America when I say that we could have used some public Mark Davis rage Sunday. It was a game that demanded it, frankly, and there are so few demands the Raiders make upon us otherwise.Ray Ratto is a columnist for CSNBayArea.com

Donald Penn: Raiders players trust McKenzie will add right pieces

Donald Penn: Raiders players trust McKenzie will add right pieces

The Raiders were pretty darn good last season. A 12-4 record proved that point. There was plenty of talent on a team with a penchant for high-wire acts in victory that masked the fact there were holes on the roster.

They need to be filled for the Raiders to improve in 2017, and new players will be imported through free agency and the draft.

Left tackle Donald Penn is excited to see who gets added, but said there’s no doubt talent is coming to Oakland. He speaks for Raiders players, who have faith that general manager Reggie McKenzie will make the right moves.

“Things that Reggie has done in past drafts have been great, and we’re looking forward to seeing what he brings back towards us,” Penn said recently during an in-studio appearance on NFL Network. “We can’t wait to get back out there healthy. We’re ready to hit the football world with a storm.”

While new guys are coming, a few might head out. The Raiders have several unrestricted free agents. Penn wants to keep his guys around – he mentioned running back Latavius Murray by name -- though he has some ideas for McKenzie’s checklist.

The Raiders don’t need much with most key players under contract – the Raiders should be less active in free agency over past offseasons – but a few key components could put this team over the top.

“If we stick to Reggie’s plan, we’ll be great,” Penn said. “I know he’s going to have a great draft, add a couple little pieces here and there – maybe somebody in the secondary to help out a little bit.

"On offense, you could always use a weapon. Maybe we get another receiver to take (pressure off Michael Crabtree and Amari Cooper), but we have a good nucleus right now.”

Raiders LT Donald Penn: QB Derek Carr 'almost 100 percent'

Raiders LT Donald Penn: QB Derek Carr 'almost 100 percent'

Derek Carr is on the mend. The Raiders franchise quarterback had surgery to repair his fibula shortly after he broke it in a Week 16 victory over Indianapolis, and is recovering well during the offseason.

Carr insisted on intense rehab this winter in an attempt – however unlikely it may have been – to return should the Raiders have played in the Super Bowl. It slowed to a normal pace after the Raiders' loss at Houston in the postseason’s opening round, but those in contact with him say he’s making strides.

Left tackle Donald Penn was recently in contact with Carr, and provided an update on Monday during an in-studio appearance on NFL Network.

“I texted Derek (a few) days ago checking in,” Penn said, “and he said he’s almost 100 percent.”

Surgically-repaired broken filbulas take significant time to heal, and the Raiders plan to be conservative with their MVP candidate during the offseason. Derek Carr’s brother and NFL Network analyst David Carr, who was on set with Penn on Monday, said Derek could be back for offseason work.

“He’s doing good,” David Carr said. “He’s walking around already, stretching it out. You can’t do a lot for the bone, right? But he’s going to be back. He’s going to get a whole full offseason in. That’s going to be the best part.”