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Raiders fall to Seattle, finish preseason winless

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Raiders fall to Seattle, finish preseason winless

Sep. 2, 2011
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SEATTLE (AP) Terrelle Pryor's night consisted of holding a clipboard, with an earpiece hooked to his left ear and a football tucked under his left arm.So much for Pryor getting any playing time before his five-game suspension kicks in.See ya in October, Terrelle.Thomas Clayton and Vai Taua had short touchdowns runs, Jeff Reed kicked two field goals, and the Seattle Seahawks closed out the preseason with an uninspiring 20-3 victory over the Oakland Raiders on Friday night.
RELATED: Raiders vs. Seahawks In-game notes
While Seattle's offense showed some bright spots that should make fans a little less apprehensive heading into the regular season opener on Sept. 11 in San Francisco, most of the focus was on the Raiders' sideline and if Pryor would get into the game.Raiders coach Hue Jackson hadn't committed to anything related to Pryor and as the final minutes of the fourth quarter ticked away, it was Kyle Boller continuing to take snaps and Pryor serving as a spectator.Jackson said he was briefly tempted to give Pryor a few snaps, but ultimately decided he didn't want to put Pryor in a situation where he might not yet be familiar with what the Raiders were trying to do."I had thought about it, but again there was so much pressure and having to call plays I know he hadn't had a chance to practice," Jackson said. "I didn't want to put him in an uncomfortable situation. I don't think that's fair to the kid."While Pryor was the focal point for Oakland, the Seahawks were bitten by the fear every coach faces going into the final preseason game. Seattle coach Pete Carroll said that guard Robert Gallery and defensive lineman Jimmy Wilkerson both sustained knee sprains that are "significant enough we have to be concerned about next week."Gallery was one of Seattle's marquee free-agent signings, coming over from Oakland to provide a veteran presence on Seattle's young offensive line."Those are two significant shots we've got to take a look at and see where Robert will be and where Jimmy will be for the next week," Carroll said.Friday was the final chance for Oakland to see Pryor on the field before he serves his five-game suspension handed down by Commissioner Roger Goodell as part of his entry into the NFL supplemental draft.It's been less than two weeks since Oakland selected the controversial former Ohio State star in the third round of the supplemental draft. He signed a four-year contract with the Raiders a few days later. Pryor gave up his final season with the Buckeyes after an investigation into the team's memorabilia-for-cash scandal that cost coach Jim Tressel his job."I think the young man can play quarterback," Jackson said. "Right now it's not really about him, it's about the team, but this young man, he can throw it, he works at it and it's important to him."Reed kicked field goals of 25 and 36 yards, and Sebastian Janikowski made a 34-yarder for the Raiders.While the majority of the starters for both teams were on the bench resting well before halftime, there were some notable exceptions. Seattle rookie right tackle James Carpenter, who struggled badly last week in Denver, played nearly the entire game, only taking a second quarter break when Breno Giacomini got reps with the Seahawks No. 1 offensive line.Fellow Seattle rookie lineman John Moffitt played three full quarters before giving way in the fourth.With Carpenter and Moffitt playing better, Seattle starting quarterback Tarvaris Jackson was finally given time to throw.Jackson played less than one entire quarter. He was 5 of 7 for 88 yards, but forced one throw toward Golden Tate in the end zone and was intercepted by Oakland safety Tyvon Branch. Even though Jackson was back on the sideline before the end of the first, his two drives nearly created two scores and rolled up 100 yards of offense.Tate's status on the Seahawks' final roster was put to rest with an impressive showing.Tate had five catches for 79 yards, including a 43-yard reception from Jackson where he beat safety Michael Huff off the line of scrimmage. Later in the first half, Tate returned a kickoff 34 yards and at the end of the half had a 43-yard punt return that set up a field-goal attempt at the end of the half."It took a little pressure off of me," Tate said. "I definitely saw the blogs saying I could be cut, released, traded or whatever so hopefully I showed the coaches that I can play this game and they'll keep me around a little longer."Oakland went with its starting offense for much of the first half with Jason Campbell not checking out until the final few minutes of the second quarter. Campbell went 8 for 11 for 76 yards in his final action before the Raiders' opener Sept. 12 at Denver."I felt good. I thought the offensive line did a great job protecting us. Once again I don't think I got touched," Campbell said. "I was able to make rhythm passes and get the ball out quickly. We just got to learn to finish drives."

Edwards Jr. 'believing in myself again' after rough stretch

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AP

Edwards Jr. 'believing in myself again' after rough stretch

ALAMEDA – Mario Edwards Jr. has always been a big kid. He stood 6-foot-1, 215 as a freshman in high school, but could bench 315 and run like a receiver. Freak size and athleticism made him a dominant football player.

Edwards Jr. was a five-star recruit at Billy Ryan High in Denton, Texas, rated the nation’s best defensive tackle and the No. 3 overall recruit. Not in the district or the state. In the country.

Texas, Oklahoma, Texas A&M, Alabama, Notre Dame and LSU, among others, were knocking on the door, but Edwards Jr. ultimately followed his father’s footsteps with an early commitment to Florida State.

Have all that going for you and a driver’s license and you can be a prince of Texas.

“It was kind of cool,” Edwards Jr. said on the Raiders Insider Podcast. “At 16 and 17 years old, I was doing magazine cover shoots and things like that. It sped up the process of dealing with where I’m at now. It got me prepped for this in a sense. And having my dad there, giving me the blueprint also helped as well.”

Mario Edwards Sr. blazed a trail from Florida State to the NFL as a defensive back. Junior knew exactly what it would to live his dream in professional football. As a prep and early in college, it didn’t require much work. His father instilled an improved work ethic later in college that got him ready for the pre-draft process and the pros.

“It was like I had all the answers to the test,” Edwards said. “He’s been everywhere that I’ve tried to go. He’s played at the highest level. He has been hurt. He has been to a top college and the pros. Having him there to filter out all the bad thoughts and help me to stay positive and continuing to work was great.”

That sounding board was a luxury during good times. It was a necessity during a recently rough stretch.

Edwards Jr. burst onto the scene in 2015, shortly after the Raiders took him No. 35 overall. Then he suffered a neck injury in Week 15 that year – Mario explains that situation in the podcast -- and didn’t return until June. He was back and rocking again in 2016’s training camp, but suffered a hip injury in the preseason opener and missed 14 weeks.

He wasn’t himself upon return, but another full offseason brought his explosiveness back. That’s clear watching Edwards Jr. play this season. He’s on a tear to start the year with two sacks – a full sack and two half sacks – and four quarterback pressures. He’s an effective part of the line rotation inside and out, with versatility to play multiple techniques.

The Raiders have been waiting to pair Edwards Jr. with edge rushers Khalil Mack and Bruce Irvin. They can do that now, with impact rookie Eddie Vanderdoes added to the mix. Edwards Jr. is happy, healthy and playing well, free and clear of questions about his health. His dad helped him get through the down times, and continue improving during this productive period.

“I was talking to him the other day, and saying how much I have prayed and trusted the process and am believing in myself again,” Edwards Jr. said. “I’m finally getting my mojo back, and feeling like myself.”

Raiders QB Derek Carr channels inner pop star in mock music video ad

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Raiders QB Derek Carr channels inner pop star in mock music video ad

ALAMEDA – Derek Carr is trying to moonlight as a pop star. That’s what a guerilla marketing campaign by a San Joaquin Valley credit union would have you believe.

They released billboards and short video teasers of the Raiders quarterback prepping to shoot a music video this summer, and the full video/commercial spot was released on Monday.

It’s well, something else. Clearly meant to be self deprecating, Carr is pumping up Educational Employees Credit Union and their great rates in the mock music video, where Carr is given a certain boy-band vibe. Take a look: 

Derek’s brother David shows up later in the ad, clearly upset at being outshined by little bro.

It’s the latest in an annual series of ads with the Carr brothers.

“It literally took us a couple of hours. That’s it,” Derek Carr said. "All of the takes were because I kept laughing. I couldn’t even take myself serious because they had the TV prompter so I could see it, and I couldn’t even take myself serious. But it was good. It was fun because every commercial we do with them, all we want to do is, the end goal is we want people to laugh. And if they laugh at me for it, that’s good, that’s what we want. I laughed at myself, so it’s all good with me.”

That begged a hard-hitting, journalist follow-up question. So, Derek, did you keep the jacket?

“I didn’t keep it, no. Gosh, no,” Carr said. "As soon as I walked in and we had our little dressing rooms, me and my brother looked at that jacket and I was like, ‘I really hope that’s not the one.’ And sure enough it was. But that’s alright. We have a good relationship with them and it was a lot of fun.”