Source: Cal to reinstate 5 sports targeted for cuts

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Source: Cal to reinstate 5 sports targeted for cuts

Feb. 10, 2011

CSNBayArea.com staff

The five sports designated for elimination at Cal due to budget cuts will be reinstated, a source close to the situation has told Comcast SportsNet Bay Area.

The announcement from the university on the future of baseball, rugby, men's and women's gymnastics' and women's lacrosse was originally expected Thursday, but an e-mail from Dan Mogulof in the campus Public Affairs office on Thursday morning said that the announcement was not forthcoming.

The following is a portion of that message:
An announcement of the final decision regarding the reinstatement of Cal Athletics will not take place this morning. The process of gathering, verifying and analyzing the large number of individual philanthropic commitments made to the Save Cal Sports effort is proving to be complicated and time consuming.

The group "Save Cal Sports" had been soliciting funding from private donors to prevent the programs from elimination. It was announced four months ago that the university would reduce the number of teams from 29 to 24 to save an estimated 4 million annually.

BACH: Cal to prevail, regardless of ruling

On Feb. 1, athletic director Sandy Barbour announced that a decision would be made within the next 10 days.

Previously, UC Berkeley Chancellor Robert Birgeneau had stated that the decision on the fate of the programs rested on a goal of raising 25 million to fund operating expenses for 5-to-10 years. Additionally, he sought a plan for the creation of an endowment to fund the programs in the future.

I don't skate like a man, just a darn good woman

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I don't skate like a man, just a darn good woman

In late December, I was invited to play in a pick-up hockey game with some other members of the local sports media community. It shouldn’t come as a surprise that I was one of only two women there that day. Even now, female ice hockey players aren’t exactly common.

After the game, a reporter I’ve known a while – a guy I like a lot – said to me: “Don’t take this the wrong way, but you skate like a man.” I didn’t take it wrong, of course; he meant it as a compliment. The reporter wanted nothing more than to tell me I’d impressed him.

I thought about this exchange a lot in the days that followed. Had someone told me I played hockey like a boy when I was 15, I would have worn that description like a badge. Hell yeah, 15-year-old Sarah would have thought, I do play like a boy. I’m as tough as a boy. I’m as fierce and competitive as any boy on my team. I would have reveled in it, just as I reveled in a similar label I’d received even earlier in my adolescence: tomboy.

Yeah, I was a tomboy. I hung around with the neighborhood boys, riding bikes between each other’s houses or catching salamanders in the creek that ran through town. I loved sports, and my bedroom walls -- papered with newspaper clippings and photos of Flyers players -- were a far cry from the pink-tinged rooms that belonged to the girls at school. 

As much as I could, I dressed like a boy too, even once cutting the sleeves off of an oversized T-shirt before I went out to rollerblade with our next-door neighbors. My grandmother, who was visiting at the time, pulled me aside to tell me I really ought to dress more appropriately. I rolled my eyes.
I was a tomboy, and I loved the word and everything it stood for. I felt pride in my tomboyishness, believing that the things I liked – the things boys liked – were clearly better than the things stereotypically left to the girls.

I’m almost embarrassed to admit it was a conversation with a 15-year-old that changed my perspective, just a few days after my reporter friend had compared my hockey skills to those of a man. I sat down with Mo’ne Davis, the female Little League pitching phenom, for this very project. I asked her if she identified as a tomboy, and she shrugged. Not really, she said. Maybe other people wanted to define her that way, she suggested, but that wasn’t how she viewed things.

You know that record scratch sound effect they play on TV or in the movies? The one that denotes a sort of “wait … what?!” moment? That’s what happened in my head. Mo’ne Davis, the girl who played on the boys’ team and excelled, didn’t consider herself a tomboy?

Something clicked in my head after that. I’ve long identified as a feminist, and I’ve been a big supporter of girls in sports for as long as I can remember. I coach girls hockey, I’ve spoken at schools and camps about playing and working in sports as a woman. For some reason, though, it took a 15-year-old shrugging her shoulders at the label “tomboy” to take the power out of the word for me. Why does one have to be a tomboy, when one can simply be a girl who kicks ass? How had I never considered this before?

In many ways (and especially in sports) if something is male, it’s considered superior. It goes beyond just the things kids like to do, and it’s all old news. It’s also something I’m ashamed to admit I’ve bought into for practically all of my life. But no longer. How can I help change the narrative if I’m too busy playing along with it?

And if I could do it over, when that reporter approached me after our hockey game to tell me I skated like a man, I would have smiled, shook my head and said: Nah. But I skate like a darn good woman.

Reports: Rockets acquire Lou Williams from Lakers

Reports: Rockets acquire Lou Williams from Lakers

The Los Angeles Lakers have swung their first deal of the Magic Johnson Era, agreeing to send Lou Williams to the Houston Rockets for Corey Brewer and a future draft pick.

Brewer's agent Wallace Prather confirmed the terms of the trade, which were first reported Tuesday by Yahoo Sports. Neither team immediately revealed the trade publicly.

"Thanx for the love L.A., I've enjoyed my stay," Williams wrote on Twitter.

Williams led the Lakers in scoring at 18.6 points per game, playing off the bench. Brewer was averaging 4.2 points for Houston.

The trade came hours after the Lakers announced the firing of general manager Mitch Kupchak and put Johnson in charge of basketball operations - part of a massive front office shake-up.

And while the draft pick will help the Lakers' future, the Rockets just got deeper.

Williams has scored more points off the bench than anyone else in the NBA this season - and Eric Gordon, the newly crowned 3-point shootout champion at All-Star weekend - is No. 2 on that list.

Reserves have three games of 35 points or more in the NBA this season, all by Williams, all in a dazzling seven-day span in early December. He had 40 points against Memphis, 38 against Utah and 35 against Phoenix.

Williams has also been to the playoffs six times with three different teams, seeing action in 41 postseason contests. He's under contract for $7 million next season.

Brewer is also under contract for next season, at about $7.6 million.

"Thanks to everyone in the Houston Rockets organization for my time here," Brewer wrote in a statement released on Twitter. "A special thanks to all the great fans of the Rockets for making this city a special place to live and play."