Warriors

Curry injures ankle, Warriors beat Dallas 111-87

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Curry injures ankle, Warriors beat Dallas 111-87

BOX SCORE

OAKLAND The Warriors knocked off the defending champion Dallas Mavericks, who were playing their third game in three nights. David Lee, Monta Ellis and Nate Robinson led the Warriors, but it wasnt all good. Point guard Stephen Curry re-injured his right ankle in the second half and did not return.Warriors 111, Mavericks 87
Player of the game: Power forward David Lee had 21 of his team-high 25 points in the first half to lead the Warriors (16-21) past Dallas.Key stretch: The Warriors held the Mavericks to 15 points in the first quarter and led 26-15 after 12 minutes. The Warriors were never threatened after that.Curry hurt: Warriors point guard Stephen Curry injured his right ankle again this time midway through the third quarter. Curry was handling the ball near midcourt and was driving to his right.It was not clear if he stepped on a defenders foot or if he simply rolled it. But he came out of the game immediately and was in pain.He was also incredibly frustrated. First, Curry threw his mouthpiece towards the Warriors bench and then he smacked one of the seats on the bench as trainer Chad Bergman began to work on him.Eventually, Curry went to the locker room and was re-taped. He eventually came back and joined his teammates on the bench. The Warriors called the injury a mild ankle sprain and said his return was to be determined.Solid D: The Mavericks struggled from the field in the first half, going just 13-for-41 (31.7 percent) from the floor. They were even worse in the first period, shooting 27.3 percent.Nowitzki missed five of his first six shots, Jason Terry missed six of his first seven shots and Lamar Odom missed four of his first five attempts.Lees big half: The Warriors led 52-42 at halftime, and David Lee had a big part in it. Lee had 21 points and six rebounds in 19 first-half minutes. Lee went 9-for-13 from the floor in the first half and 3-for-3 from the line.Curry starts: Warriors point guard Stephen Curry was back in the starting lineup for Saturdays game against Dallas. Since returning from a strained tendon in his right foot against Toronto on Monday, Jackson has been bringing Curry off the bench and keeping Dominic McGuire in with the starters.No Kidd: Dallas point guard Jason Kidd didnt play on Saturday. Coach Rick Carlisle gave Kidd the night off since the Mavericks were playing their third game in three nights.No Biedrins: Warriors center Andris Biedrins earned a DNP-CD on Saturday night. Biedrins lost his starting spot during the Warriors last road trip, but he was used in backup role after that.Not on Saturday. Biedrins earned his first DNP-CD of the season.

Trapped by social media monster, KD taught a harsh lesson

Trapped by social media monster, KD taught a harsh lesson

Kevin Durant has publicly pummeled himself into swollen submission, and he was the first to say he deserved every punch after falling thumbs first into the trap set by the monster we adore.

That would be social media and its maliciously seductive bait.

It’s addictive, and mesmerizing enough to have folks staring into the light of smartphones at all hours of the night or walking down the sidewalk at midday bumping into others caught up in the same maze.

Caught up in the insanity last Sunday, Durant got too honest and too cheeky. His response to a question posed on Twitter -- essentially seeking deeper reasons for his decision to leave Oklahoma City for the Warriors -- exposed some raw opinions, belittling his former Thunder teammates, as well as the organization while also directly criticizing coach Billy Donovan. Only star guard Russell Westbrook, the other half of what once was OKC’s dynamic duo, was spared.

It was KD unfiltered, inadvertently sharing with the Twitterverse the kinds of blunt assessments he most assuredly would rather keep confined to his inner circle. That much we can assume insofar as his points of view were issued in the third person.

After realizing firestorm ignited by his “oops” moment, Durant deleted both responses, though far too late to avoid embarrassment.

So there he was Tuesday on stage during TechCrunch Disrupt SF summit, smacking himself with both fists, kicking himself with both feet and offering up a stream of apologies that seemed as sincere as any we’ve heard from someone caught in a compromising position.

“I use Twitter to engage with fans,” Durant said. “I happened to take it a little too far.

“That’s what happens sometime when I get into these basketball debates about what I really love, to play basketball. I don’t regret clapping back at anybody or talking to my fans on Twitter. I do regret using my former coach’s name and the former organization I played for.

“That was childish. That was idiotic, all those types of words. I regret doing that and I apologize for that.”

Durant, who according to USA Today sent a personal apology to Donovan, didn’t stop the self-flagellation there.

“I look like an idiot,” he told the newspaper. “My peers are going to look at me like an idiot. All the jokes -- bring ‘em. I deserve it.

“The second I realized what I did, I felt like (bleep). Like I said, I look at that stuff as a joke and a big game. Sometimes when I’m in it, I take it too far and I’m in it too much, too deep. But it’s just out of sight, out of mind. I won’t fall into that problem again. I definitely have to move on and not worry about anybody on Twitter, even though it’s fun. You know what I mean?”

The many available forms of social media can be fun indeed. They can, if properly utilized, be informative. They also represent a form of conversation rife with pitfalls.

Rarely a week goes by without a high profile individual -- athletes, entertainers, politicians et al -- going full jackass on Twitter or Facebook or Instagram or some other device. Photos of private parts meant for an individual have been inadvertently shared and, therefore, gone viral.

How many poor souls that have fallen into this trap been forced to respond by saying they’ve been hacked?

A man like Durant, with almost 17 million Twitter followers, deserves kudos for taking the time to engage with his audience. But once down that path, it can be exceedingly perilous. Durant disclosed that his gaffe was upsetting enough to disrupt both his appetite and sleep pattern.

Honesty is a noble trait. Brutal honesty can be provocative. Brutal honesty attached to withering critique can result in disastrous consequences.

Durant is a smart guy who made a dumb mistake. He stepped into muck that was hip deep. This is going to stick to him for a while, as it should.

It’s a harsh lesson, but some of the most enduring lessons are learned the hard way.

How to free agent: Iguodala played Rockets, market like a fiddle this offseason

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USATSI

How to free agent: Iguodala played Rockets, market like a fiddle this offseason

Andre Iguodala was very nearly an ex-Warrior, which we suspected at the time and had reaffirmed by ESPN’s Chris Haynes.

He was reportedly very close to joining the Rockets after "the best recruiting presentation of all time" from GM Daryl Morey that included a plan to beat the Warriors and highlighted how much more money Iguodala would take home, after taxes and cost of living, in Texas. Houston thought they had him.
 
But the fascinating lesson in all the twists and turns of his free agency/hunt for maximum value is how rare situations like his actually are.
 
He took control of his negotiations, something most players don’t (or feel they can’t) do. He was working with the casino’s money in that he had several teams that wanted him, rather than the other way around. He was negotiating with people who had targeted pitches from which he could make easy and educated choices.
 
It was free agency in heaven. Most aren’t that good.
 
Then again, most players aren’t Andre Iguodala, whose comfort in his own skin, both as a player and otherwise, gives him an advantage most athletes don’t have. They live in an uncertain world, where one is always an ACL, a bad personal choice, a foolish decision or just plain bad luck away from the street.
 
In other words, free agency would work for him because he had developed the tools to make it work for him.
 
But it also serves as a healthy reminder for the Warriors’ brain trust that they are not the be-all and end-all that so many of their acolytes think they are. They may already know that – one suspects they do – but knowing how close they came to losing one of their own, one they wanted desperately to keep, is a good post-it note with the legend, “Not everybody loves you unconditionally all the time. Not even you.”
 
In short, while they lucked their way into Nirvana (nobody could have figured Stephen Curry, Klay Thompson or Draymond Green would grow as they have), they had to work hard to polish it (Kevin Durant) and even harder to maintain it (Iguodala).
 
So the lesson is this: Dynasties are hard to make, even harder to maintain, and they don’t even have one yet.