No ankle update after Curry's visit to Charlotte


No ankle update after Curry's visit to Charlotte

Warriors guard Stephen Curry was in Charlotte Monday to have his ailing right ankle examined by Dr. Bob Anderson, who performed the initial surgery this past offseason, as Insider Matt Steinmetz reported. It was the second opinion after team orthopedist Tim McAdams examined Curry's ankle on Saturday.

General manager Larry Riley issued the following statement Tuesday:

Following the examinations and consultations with both doctors, the diagnosis of Stephens injury remains a sprained right ankle with no structural damage. Stephen will continue to receive treatment and undergo rehabilitation therapy. He will be cleared to play whenever he is able to pass a functionality test on his right ankle.

While not necessarily an acute medical update, the fact that Curry has been significantly hobbled with no structural damage does not bode well for a productive season.

The Warriors signed point guard Nate Robinson to a one-year deal on Jan. 4.

In 'no-brainer' move, Warriors exercise Looney's option for 2017-18

In 'no-brainer' move, Warriors exercise Looney's option for 2017-18

OAKLAND – Fingers crossed and knocking on wood, the Warriors opened training camp four weeks ago hoping Kevon Looney would survive the preseason.

The 6-foot-9 forward did more than that, easily clearing the ultra-low bar set for someone striving to keep alive his NBA dreams after surgery on both hips.

Looney was rewarded on Sunday, when the Warriors announced they were exercising the third-year option on the UCLA product, extending his contract with the team through the 2017-18 season.

“It was a no-brainer,” coach Steve Kerr said after practice. “He’s the 30th pick (in the 2015 NBA draft). He missed all of last year. We pick up the option and have him locked up for next year after, I think, a really good training camp.”

Warriors general manager Bob Myers saw enough to give the team another year to develop Looney and assess his potential. As a rookie last season, Looney appeared in only five games, a total of 21 minutes, between hip surgeries.

He played in six of seven preseason games, making one start and totaling 73 minutes. He shot 50 percent from the field and ranked fifth on the team in rebounding, exceeding his own expectations.

“I was actually real nervous,” he said, “because last time it was a little different. I came back in the middle of the season, so my rehab was different. I didn’t have a chance to really practice with the guys. They were already in the full swing of things.

“So this is really my first time playing with the guys. I was a little nervous. I was nervous about my hips last time, and I went down again. I feel much more confident. I feel ready.”

Looney, still smoothing out his gait, conceded that he’s still seeking rhythm on offense, saying he’s not yet comfortable with his shot but acknowledging that it’s not a major issue on a team with so many talented shooters.

Kerr considers Looney capable of providing help at power forward and center. The coach does not seem worried about Looney’s offense.

“Now he’s healthy, knock on wood,” Kerr said. “So it was an easy decision for Bob. We briefly talked about (picking up the option), but it wasn’t even really a decision. It was just automatic.”

Piston claims 2004 champs would beat 2016 Warriors: 'No comparison'

Piston claims 2004 champs would beat 2016 Warriors: 'No comparison'

With the addition of Kevin Durant, the Warriors appear to have assembled one of the greatest teams in the history of the NBA.

But one former NBA champion believes his squad would beat the Warriors' "super team."

In a recent interview, Richard "Rip" Hamilton said his 2003-04 Pistons had the defensive capability to stop the Warriors.

"It would be no comparison. We can guard every position. Every guy from our point guard to our five, can guard any position. We were big. We were long," Hamilton told CBS Sports' NBA Crossover.

In addition to Hamilton, those Pistons had Chauncey Billups, Ben Wallace, Rasheed Wallace and Tayshaun Prince, among others. They finished the regular season in second place in the Central Division with a 54-28 record. As the No. 3 seed in the Eastern Conference, the Pistons went on to beat the Lakers in five games in the NBA Finals.

The Pistons that year allowed 84.3 points per game, which was the second-best mark in the NBA that year.